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Our Team

Executive Team

We are a grassroots group of parents, community members and educators committed to promoting comprehensive U.S. history to be taught in Georgia K-12 schools.

Weonhee Shin

Weonhee Shin Chair/Executive Director

Weonhee Shin
Ruth Youn

Ruth Youn Vice Chair

Ruth Youn
Jeanie-Duque-Dizon.jpg

Jeanie Duque Dizon Secretary

Jeanie Duque Dizon
Tracey Alviar

Tracey Alviar Education Resources & Curriculum

Tracey Alviar
Sohyun An

Sohyun An Education Resources & Curriculum

Sohyun An

Special Projects Volunteers

Justine-Chung.jpg

Justine Chung Marketing & Graphic Design

Justine Chung
Jackie

Jackie Kwun Student Ambassador

Jackie Kwun
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Weonhee Shin

Weonhee was raised in Virginia and now resides with her family in Decatur, GA. Although she attended public K-12 schools, she didn’t learn of America’s diverse history until adulthood. She is now advocating for a different educational experience for students here in Georgia. Learn more about her perspective and experiences here.

Ruth Youn

Ruth is a Texas-born, second gen Chinese-Taiwanese immigrant. She is a writer, educator and activist who is working and parenting two children in Atlanta, Georgia. Despite being educated in the public school system and graduating from a public university, she only learned about Asian American history a few years ago—via a podcast!

On another note, Ruth does not have any dogs or an herb garden. She does, however, have a special Lunar New Year edition Lego set that she recently built and is extremely proud of! 

Jeanie Duque Dizon

Jeanie Dizon is a graduate of Brown University and received her MFA from The American Film Institute. As a documentary filmmaker, she has focused on children and human rights. Her feature Death of a Cemetery documented the plight of the living residents of Manila North Cemetery in the Philippines and highlighted how vulnerable populations are at the mercy of disease and climate change. She is also a writer who pens about Asian American issues, from motherhood to racism faced by immigrants.

Her interest in education started when she noticed a lack of Asian American History being taught in schools, even during Asian American Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. She is a passionate advocate for the inclusion of Asian American stories and history into school curriculum.

Tracey Alviar

Dr. Alviar-Martin is an Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction whose scholarship focuses on civic education from global, human rights, and comparative perspectives. Originally from Manila, before joining academia Theresa taught in international schools in Hong Kong and Bangkok; and a refugee camp in the Philippines. Her publications include articles in Teaching and Teacher Education, Theory and Research in Social Education, Teachers College Record, and an edited volume, “Research on global citizenship in Asia: Conceptions, perceptions and practice” (Information Age Press, 2021).

Sohyun An

Dr. An is a social studies teacher educator and curriculum scholar. She is an immigrant from South Korea and a mother of two children in Georgia’s public schools. She teaches, researches, and parents with a goal for a world that hurts less.

Justine Chung

Justine is a graphic designer, wife, and mom to two kids and 40+ plant babies. She loves traveling, art, photography, culture and mostly FOOD.

She lives in Decatur but has lived in a few different countries growing up. Being a minority Asian in places she’s lived, she often experienced feeling like an outsider.

She believes representation and advocacy matter, especially if we can integrate them into early education. Growing minds will accept diversity more openly and effortlessly if they are exposed to different cultures early on. Kids in marginalized groups will feel more confident if they see themselves represented in culture and history. That’s why she became interested in helping out with AAVEd; big changes come from small steps.

Justine contributes with the visual communication aspect. What we say and how we say it is most important and always helps if it is visually on the spot!

Jackie Kwun

Student Ambassador

Tell us about your experiences with studying history in school:
In 7th grade I was excited to finally learn about Asia, but then was quickly disappointed. All I really took from the lessons was that China has pollution, a dam and Communism. We watched a documentary about North Korea, and kids were giggling at the brainwashed people under North Korean rule, and learned that in India [people] throw bodies into the Ganges river (kids were laughing at the “funny” Indian accents), and the list just goes on.

It felt really humiliating when other kids would glance at me, assuming I was from China [where it was polluted and Communist]. Many of my Asian friends also felt the same way and we were left dissatisfied, learning about the worst [aspects] of our heritage. Nothing we talked about put any of the [Asian] countries in a good light. 

What motivated you to serve at AAVEd?
As an Asian American student in GA public schools, I have always felt underrepresented in the school curriculum where diverse stories and histories are not included nor celebrated. I have always wanted to make a difference in my world but wasn’t sure where to begin. After coming across AAVEd, I felt like this could be the place where I can grow and take a stand for myself. So I took a step forward, and here I am :D

What do you hope to accomplish in your time with us?
As of right now, I’d like to continue creating weekly highlights of Asian American stories so that our histories are accessible and celebrated. I’d also like to work with other students to start a youth coalition in my local community. I’m ready for the ride! 

Fun fact: 
If I could shape-shift into something, I’d be a rock—so that I could sleep all the time!